Tag Archives: Coronavirus

Remembering

Remembrance Day July 15 2045

A man about 70 years old is sitting in a backyard chatting with his eight year old granddaughter as their family is preparing for other family members to arrive.

Grandpa, did we celebrate Remembrance Day when you were my age?

No, not when I was your age. I was closer to your mom and dad’s age. This day has only been a national holiday for a little over twenty years, w,ell before you were born.

Mom and Dad say we get together because of a bad virus that spread all over the world and we remember so we don’t forget. Why do we want to remember a virus that got lots of people sick?

Well, it’s not so much the virus we remember but those who were most affected by it. We remember the people who didn’t get better and the people who helped us get through that time.

You mean like doctors and nurses?

Yes, like doctors and nurses but so many more who risked their own health so that others would remain safe. People like first responders, police officers, firefighters, and those in the military. There were so many.

They’re always the heroes, right?

Yes, they are, but there were many other people who put their own health at risk so the rest of us could live our lives safely at home. Before that time, we never gave much thought to truck drivers or people who worked in food stores as heroes, but those drivers transported food to the stores, even though it was risky. And the people who worked at those stores showed up everyday so that the rest of us were able to purchase food.
Teachers made sure their students continued to learn, people who worked in pharmacies made sure people continued to get their medicine,  restaurants stayed open so that some people could order food if they couldn’t get to the grocery stores. Maintenance people made sure the hospitals stayed clean and those who worked in banks kept coming in so people could get money if they needed it. I’ve probably not mentioned nearly as many heroes as there were during that time.

So that’s what today is about?

Partly, yes. We want to remember all those who lost someone and we want to give thanks to those who helped us get through that period of time.  We don’t ever want to forget any of them.

Do all countries celebrate this day?

Well, a few other countries remember this pandemic in their own way, but they don’t call it Remembrance Day since that name means something different for other countries.

Mom and Dad said things changed after the virus. Did they change a lot?

For many, yes. Others just went back to the same routine and the life they lived before this happened.

What kind of things changed?

Well, you know we lost our way of life for a while; our freedom to go where we wanted when we wanted. To see and hug  the people we love the most. You really don’t know how much you miss something until it’s been taken away from you. Then you realize you miss it even more than you could have imagined.
People used to live very busy lives. Many families never had dinner together, were pulled in different directions and missed family celebrations or birthdays, because of commitments they thought were important.

People really missed birthday parties and celebrations?

Sadly, yes. But a strange thing happened after this was over. Some people came to understand what was really important in life. That you can’t get some days back. There’s only one of them and when you miss it, it’s gone forever. Just like people. Unfortunately, some people learned that the hard way.

So people changed?

Like I said ,some did. But not all. You see, during that time you really couldn’t go anywhere and families were forced to spend a lot of time together. So instead of rushing around with other commitments, they went for walks, played games, ate together, talked a lot more, went for bike rides, read books, watched movies, cooked meals together and just hung out. They had time to make time for each other. Sometimes they got on each others nerves, but when it was over and they were able to do the things they did before, some realized they would miss what they had during the time they were forced to stay home. They decided they wanted more of their down time and less of the craziness they had before. So they changed the way they lived their lives. They made compromises and adjustments so they could have the best of both worlds. They realized it was easy to do if they just focused on what was most important to them.
But like I said, not everyone felt them same way.

Did our family change?

Eventually yes, but it took a little time, which was probably true of most people.

Mom and Dad said people who used to work in offices had to go in everyday. That must have been weird for kids. I couldn’t imagine not having mom or dad home almost everyday.

Well, it wasn’t weird before the virus. In fact, that was pretty standard. But two things happened. People realized they could work just as efficiently from home and be able to spend more time with their families. And companies realized if they allowed that to happen without it affecting their business their employees would be happier and they could cut down on the amount of office space they needed and save some money on rent in the process. So there was a compromise of sorts. Some people began working in the office one to three days a week on rotating shifts. Not all jobs could do that, of course, but quite a bit more than people realized just a few months earlier.

So the virus wasn’t all bad?

Well, for some it was terrible. Many people lost family members and some nurses and doctors had a tough time healing after what they experienced. But people also became kinder to one another. If you went for a walk during that time, people who were strangers would wave to you and ask if everyone was okay. If someone needed help, they received it. People sang, and danced, told jokes, made crazy videos and raised money for those who were less fortunate and needed support.
So to answer your question,  there was some good that came out of something that was bad.

That happens a lot doesn’t it.

Yes, that happens a lot, if we pay attention and just look hard enough.

For several minutes, the little girl said nothing, looking past the people who started to arrive. Finally, she asked her grandfather if he thought  a virus like that could ever happen again.

He hesitated before answering, putting his arm around her and holding her close.

It’s possible, I suppose, though we’re much better prepared in case it ever happens again. But if that period of time taught us anything, it was to live in the moment and not worry so much about tomorrow. And our moment is coming through the door as we speak. Your cousins, aunts, uncles and grandparents are all here. How about we go remember and celebrate this day with them.

The little girl looked up at her grandfather and smiled.  I think I’m going to give them all big hugs so they know how much I love them.

The grandfather pulled the little girl close, hugged her tightly and whispered softly in her ear.

I think that’s a great idea.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What I’ve Learned In The Last Week

 

I’ve learned that whenever Anthony Fauci speaks, I listen. He has been the most honest and direct voice in speaking to the American public. We may not like to hear what he has to say, but the man doesn’t sugar coat the truth. He is giving us the worst possible scenario, if we don’t take action, but he is also giving us hope, if we make the sacrifices that are necessary right now.

I’ve learned that panic is understandable. There are so many whose lives are fragile to begin with. Throwing this type of stress and levels of restriction at them make it difficult to function. Then there are those who panic when two inches of snow is forecast. Throw in a pandemic and the roof comes off the building. This is what happens when people sense a loss of control. They attempt to gain whatever control they can in their lives and buying supplies is a beginning. Their immediate world becomes safe for the moment, and that’s and understandable human reaction.

I’ve learned, once again, that there is a special place in heaven for first responders. Those people who walk into fires when everyone else is driving as quickly as possible in the other direction .We sometimes forget that they also  families also and yet they’re out there working our communities. I pray they all stay healthy.

I’ve learned that it is possible for our political parties to work together and agree on what may be best for the country. How sad that it takes this type of situation to bring about that type of cooperation.

I’ve learned that some young people in this country just don’t get it. While it’s natural for the young to feel they are healthy and immune to what’s going on, the ignorance and indifference they show to other member of their respective families and communities is disheartening and infuriating. It’s unfortunate that the stereotype of the “me first” mentality of young people is plastered on TV’s as they party in bars and social gatherings while the rest of the country attempts to alter their lives for the greater good. They don’t understand that this isn’t about me, or you…it’s about US. Their cavalier attitude and not understanding that asymptomatic carriers will only reduce our chances of controlling this virus is hard to comprehend. Again, the majority of young people are being responsible, but there is a large segment that doesn’t get it, or just doesn’t care.

I’ve learned that the top officials in the Clearwater Beach area of Florida who refuse to close the beaches to spring breakers are being driven, not surprisingly, by greed. While the rest of the country is attempting to practice social distancing, young breakers are carrying on as if nothing is happening in their world. Even more disturbing is the attitude of the officials in these counties.
Councilman David Allbritton- “Beaches are an economic driver for us. Let’s see what happens in the next week or so, and then after that.”
City Manager Greg Mims- “There is not a lot of will to close beaches.”
Sheriff Bob Gaultieri- “I woud not support closing the beaches. With all the cancellations and business closures, people are going to need some sort of outlet. This is going to be around for a while.”
Really? I could go on but what’s the point. Money talks. It doesn’t matter that all these young people will scatter across the country after break is over and probably come to a town near you. By the way, where are the parents of these young college aged kids and why didn’t someone sit them down and say…NO, NOT THIS YEAR. Or is that not good for their fragile egos and self confidence. Maybe if we gave them a participation trophy their attitude might change. Sorry,..but  it’s discouraging to watch.

Eighty years ago, American’s did what they had to do. They rationed food and gas, worked overtime in factories and sent their children to war for years. It has been called it The Greatest Generation for a reason. While this situation is not nearly in the same ballpark, it does provide a glimpse into our mentality, attitude and ability to sacrifice for the greater good. Not for years, but maybe a few months. Are we up to the challenge?

If history has taught us anything, it has shown that there will be a reckoning of sorts when this is over. There will be a large mirror held up in front of us individually and as a nation. It will judge how we responded as a country, as individual communities, as friends, and as families.

This will define us for years to come. How it does remains to be seen.