Keeping Up With Language

I’m not sure if you plan to watch the Grammy’s tonight. After never missing them for years, I’ve only stopped in the last couple of years. It’s become a little bizarre for me and I hate to admit it but I don’t recognize many of the performers, plus much of the music sounds the same. I know that makes me sound old and I can hear the voice of my parents when I write these words but it is what it is.

Anyway, if anyone decides to watch it, I thought I’d provide a list of slang words kids are using these days along with their meaning. Sort of a cheat sheet for those of us in the out of touch crowd. It might help you enjoy the show a little more. Or not. (Apparently the days of OMG and LOL are long gone). Even if you don’t watch the show, it’s something you might use to impress your kids or grandkids, though you ‘ll probably embarrass them when you use the words. You know how that goes.

Anyway, here we go….

Bad

Bad means good, actually better than good. It’s often a reference to someones appearance.

Bet

Bet is used when you’re in agreement with something. If someone makes plans and you say “bet” that means you’re confirming said plan. Apparently the days of a simple ok isn’t clear enough.

Don’t Trip 

It simply means not to worry or stress about something. Easy one, right?

Fam

No, not your family, but close. It’s used to describe people in your life who you’re close with, good friends or homies, but not your family.

Flewed

You hear this when someone is bragging about getting “flewed out.” It means someone “bad” got flown out to a place. The difference between flown and flewed is that the latter applies to “bad” (really attractive) people. (See how we’re bundling this up?)

Get A Bag

A bag refers to money, so to get a bag means you’re acquiring money. ( I wonder where that phrase developed its origin). Must have missed that Breaking Bad episode.

No Cap

Basically it means no lie. When someone adds “no cap” to a sentence it means they’re not lying. Conversely, “cappin means lying. So when someone says, “why you cappin,” they’re asking why someone is lying.

OKurr

This is a word made popular by Cardi B, and if you don’t know who she is, it’s probably best if you don’t watch the Grammy’s. It basically means that someone is being put in their place.

Out Of Pocket

To be out-of-pocket or to say something out-of-pocket means that something is disorderly. If you say something “out-of-pocket,’ it means your comment was out of control.

Shade

You probably have heard this one. To throw shade at someone means to make an underhanded or critical remark about someone else.

Sis

Sis can be used in multiple ways. If someone asks you what happened and you respond with “sis,” it means a whole lot of drama went sown and there’s a whole lot more to the story. However, it can also be used as a term of endearment toward a friend. I guess it’s all a matter of context.

Stan

Stan is not just a fan, but a super obsessed fan.

Tea

There are multiple ways you can have your tea. You can sip it or spill it. If you’re “sipping your tea,” it means you’re minding your own business, basically side-eyeing the situation but keeping it moving. If you’re “spilling your tea,” or “having tea,” that means you have some gossip you’re ready to share.

Thirsty

Yeah, no it doesn’t mean that. Thirsty is used to describe desperation.

Weak

When someone thinks something is funny, hilarious or entertaining, they might say, “I’m weak.”

Woke

Being “woke” means to be socially conscious and aware of social injustice.

So I was going to try to be creative and combine a few of these words into sentence but apparently that’s not something one should do. Apparently too much of a good thing is not a good thing according to the users of these creative words.

So since I’m a bit thirsty and it’s cold outside I’ll just go sip some tea.

Then again, saying something like that to the wrong person might get me in big trouble. Maybe I’ll just take a nap instead. I hope that doesn’t have a sinister meaning.

Enjoy the show. You’re welcome.

65 thoughts on “Keeping Up With Language

  1. edgar62

    Thankfully no one that I am aware of uses any of these, but then, this is a country town. I have had young people (teenagers) ask to borrow MY ipod for a while because it is all Sinatra and 60s music. So, having said that, best I continue not to watch the Grammy Awards. I’ll probably watch something exciting, like Sesame Street. o:)

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  2. Pamela Read

    Hahaha. I almost spit my tea out! God knows what I just said. Like a Phoenix a new language has grown out of the old. I think I’m sticking with the original.

    Liked by 1 person

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  3. RetirementallyChallenged.com

    I won’t be watching the Grammys either. I don’t recognize most of the music and I don’t care. I listen to NPR mostly. Funny how the definition of “out of pocket” has changed over the years. I never understood how it could mean “unavailable” (used that way a lot in the business world)… and now it means out of control? Sheesh.

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    1. George Post author

      Right??? I’m not the only one. I’ve read several articles today and none were very complimentary about the show. I watched but I had it taped so I could be very selective.

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  4. Sorryless

    George,

    Props to you for this insiders guide to Grammy grammar!

    I haven’t watched the show in years on account of the fact most of my favorite singers and musicians were either long gone or no longer worthy of top billing. Which might be construed as being older, but I’d rather call it being a fan of the classics.

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    1. George Post author

      That’s a great way to put it. I tape it and watch so I can skim through the cage climbing performances. Some decent stuff last night but mostly from the older performers. At least that’s what I think..:)

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      1. George Post author

        Thank you…I don’t know why it’s so difficult for people to understand. All they have to do is listen. The ears don’t lie. Nor does that way it makes you feel. They’re still using music that’s fifty years old for commercials today. Can’t imagine that being an option fifty years from now, though I doubt commercials as we know them today will exist.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Sorryless

        True, LOL. I wonder what the next iteration of commercials will be? Interesting to think about.

        And of course that music still holds sway. It does because it mattered. These were stories, real ones, delivered by musicians who didn’t copy and paste. Original thought, how novel an idea.
        I wouldn’t trade the age I grew up inside of for anything. Being able to hear the Beatles on the radio as a young boy. And all the rest of it from there? I didn’t know how good I had it!

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Jodi

    Well – I learned a lot right here! LOL! And I just started watching the Grammy’s, and I am really enjoying it so far George! (commercial break :)) I don’t always know all the artists, but I am appreciating it all the same. So far so good – a great show so far.

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  6. Anne Mehrling

    I’ve never watched the Grammys and won’t start now. Thank you very much for the list of words I wouldn’t know how to use. I recognized one!!! That’s probably a measure of how out of touch I am, but I’m happy in my ignorance.

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  7. Lynn

    Look at you George, being all current! Admittedly, I don’t recognize many of the new faces in the music industry but I did enjoy watching the Grammy’s. Okay, so I recorded much of it because it was past my bedtime. I did mange to stay up long enough to see Shawn Mendes & Miley Cyrus. He definitely killed it & man, that girl can sing! Okay, maybe I’m thirsty. Better go have some tea.

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    1. George Post author

      Careful with the tea thing..:)
      I watched it also but like you I taped it and skimmed past the painful performances.
      I have to stay current, I have six grandchildren who keep me busy..:)

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  8. Diana

    I watched because my daughter wanted to. Haven’t seen it in a long time for the same reason as you mentioned. I don’t know more that half of these people. Good thing I had my daughter give me the names. LOL

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    1. George Post author

      Good thing I taped it so I wouldn’t have to sit through some of the painful performances. I recognized some of the names but the music doesn’t much for me, which is sad because I line music. Maybe I just shouldn’t watch anymore..:)
      Hope you’re doing well, Diana!

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  9. Ann Coleman

    I gave up watching the Grammy’s a long time ago, for basically the same reasons you did. I didn’t recognize the singers or the songs, and certainly didn’t understand the lingo. And the thing is, I’m okay with all that! I guess it is a sign of getting older, but I have reached the stage where I’ve seen so many trends come and go that I no longer feel the need to keep up. (Remember when “bread” meant money? LOL!)

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    1. George Post author

      Lol…that was a long time ago.
      I tape it and watch because I’m always hopeful I’ll catch something close to an Adele performance. But that hasn’t happened in years. I love music but this show sometimes kills it for me..:)

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  10. Book Club Mom

    Thanks for building my vocabulary – I’ll have to keep an ear out for these words! One I hear all the time is let’s bounce. (That means let’s go.) We’ve also had long discussions at home about the nuances between I’m down for that and I’m up for that. Very confusing to this old lady!

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  11. Betty

    Thanks for this post George, I’ll have to keep it for reference and I didn’t watch the Grammy’s either, not my type of music and I only knew a few of the performers. Guess this means I’m really out of touch,( “did I say that right?).

    Liked by 1 person

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    1. George Post author

      You said it right for today but we all know the language is ever changing for the young. You can keep a little cheat sheet for yourself in case you’re ever somewhere you might need it. Not sure when that might ever happen but hey, you never know..:)

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  12. The Coastal Crone

    Thank you for the lesson! And I have not even heard any of these latest slangs so I am really out of it. Not only do I not recognize those nominated for Grammys, I don’t recognize many that are in movies. Yes, I am old. Thanks for keeping my in the loop – cool!

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  13. murisopsis

    You made me grin. I remember when the phrase “jiggy wid it” was popular. My husband would sat that to our sons and they would nearly squirm out of their skin! They begged him not to use that phrase in front of their friends!

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  14. Dale

    I have to say I never watch them myself.
    As for that dictionary… well now, living in Quebec, these just don’t fly. None of them!! They have a whole ‘nother mixup of French to English, English to French, English used in French, French used in English… way to confusing 😉
    I’ll just remain my uncool self, ayt? (in case you don’t know that one, it’s alright) 😉

    Liked by 1 person

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  15. thechickengrandma

    Well…..shoot. I read this too late. No wonder I had no clue what they were talking about on the Grammys. I had to laugh about the songs all sounding the same. My husband and I agreed we didn’t know what they were saying half the time.
    Now to me….Get a bag sounds like they are getting an unattractive woman….that might show my age???

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  16. In My Cluttered Attic

    Boy am I outta touch, George. I was lost at first, then I became informed, and then I just gave up. Times are always changing, likewise, so is slang. Can’t say that I’ve watched the Grammy’s all that much—seems like so many awards are given out. I know it often runs over—remind you of any other awards show? Still, someone must watch them, why else would CBS hold onto them so tenaciously?

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  17. candidkay

    “Throwing shade” and feeling “salty” are two my eldest taught me. But to be honest, I can only keep up with so much–maybe a new phrase or two per month:). Otherwise, I forget them. Which is probably why I’m too old to call them mine anyway!

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  18. Manja Mexi Movie

    I wouldn’t know how to use any of these in the sentence, so thank you, truly. As for the show – I didn’t care for any of it, neither for Oscars last night. Those times are gone and the American hold on the world is over. 😉

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