Life Transitions

The afternoon knows what the morning never suspected
Robert Frost

We never really notice them, until we do.

We move through the early years of our lives almost seamlessly, understanding the changes that occur but viewing them as nothing more than another transition. Some are more dramatic than others, even life altering, at times. But we move on, knowing there is something up ahead, another phase in our lives. A transition from childhood to adulthood. For some it may include marriage and children. For others a career, a new business, a divorce, health issues, grandchildren, travel and even loss.

But while we’re young, or younger, there is always tomorrow. There is a confidence of tomorrow that is somewhat tempered as we age. We don’t live in fear because that type of life is not really living. We just understand the reality of life. I’m more aware of my mortality at 65 than I was at 35. That’s not morbid, it just is.

It’s the reality many people refuse to speak about. People think about it but can’t seem to verbalize their feelings. Even if they did, no one would want to hear it.

I was watching a baseball game the other day with my grandson and we were talking about this young player who is in his early 20’s. And it occurred to me that this player might have a career that lasts twenty years. It also occurred to me, though I hope to live a long healthy life, that I may not be around to see the end of his career. That’s not morbid, that a reality I never thought about before. I’ve watched sports my whole life and that single thought has never crossed my mind.

I’ve transitioned from from my youth to adulthood. I married, have raised a family and have been blessed to see my children begin their own families. I was fortunate to have a good career and I’m now retired. I’ve transitioned once again but I understand that what’s behind me is very different than what’s in front of me.

That being said, I know that I will never be any younger than I am today. In many ways, I am living the youth years of the rest of my life. I don’t know if that makes sense to everyone but it does to me. It has to. Because there is much more to see, much more to do. My mind understands the number and how many trips I’ve had around the sun but it continues to rage against the machine.

I don’t know where the next transition will take me, I only know my eyes are always open.

Just know that if I become famous in my still unknown second career, I will remember everyone who hits the like button on my posts.

 

 

 

 

72 thoughts on “Life Transitions

  1. MoJo

    So I already loved the post, but I about fell out of my chair laughing when I read the last line. Totally unexpected and utterly fabulous. Hugs from the little people. πŸ˜‰

    Liked by 2 people

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  2. Book Club Mom

    Hi George, you put this so well. While I’m not a grandmother yet, we are entering new phases in our family, as our oldest has just graduated college, our middle guys are in college and our youngest will be entering high school. I’m excited about the changes we will face and think as I get older, as long as I stay engaged and continue to be interested in life, fun times are ahead!

    Liked by 1 person

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    1. George Post author

      Congratulations on 80!!!! My mother in law is 91 and her sister is 90. Both live independently and enjoy life. You have miles to go😊

      Like

      Reply
      1. Betty

        I hope so , my Mother lived to the great age of almost a 101 and was mentality sharp till the end. I learned a lot from her ( history & life) and miss her everyday.

        Liked by 2 people

  3. Anne Mehrling

    More and more, John and I find ourselves saying, “If you go first….” Neither of us wants to be left behind. We’re in our tourist season, where we wring more out of life than during the lazy days of winter. Are you going to tell us when you begin your second career?

    Liked by 1 person

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  4. George Lacherza

    Great perspective my friend….enjoyed the post.
    last verse of a Sinatra song came to mind…thought I would share with you.

    But now the days grow short
    I’m in the autumn of the year
    And now I think of my life as vintage wine
    From fine old kegs
    From the brim to the dregs
    And it poured sweet and clear
    It was a very good year

    Stay well.
    Luca Brasi

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  5. Lynn

    Love your words & wisdom in this post George. With each new phase of life comes new learning & new experiences. It is so important to fully embrace each & every phase, living each day to our fullest.

    Liked by 1 person

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  6. colinandray

    Love it George and, at 70, will hopefully have time to finish this Comment! “Realizing your mortality” is such an important point in our development as it paints a whole new perspective of our future lives. Pre -RYM, there is always tomorrow. Post-RYM, it becomes a little less certain, which then can change ones plans considerably. The closer I get to the national average lifespan of a male here in Canada, the more I realize how much I have left to do…. and that I had better get on with it! Like you, I look into a point in the future (e.g. the next Summer Olympics), and wonder whether I will still be here! It makes for a fascinating and very enlightening existence…. let me just check my surroundings… yup… still here… must press the Post button without delay! πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

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    1. George Post author

      Lol…glad you made it through the whole post. I think the enlightenment that comes with RYM is a great way to put it. We really do have a heightened sense of “now” then we did when we were younger. And that’s natural, I suppose.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  7. joylovestravel

    Living one day at a time and squeezing every blessing from that day – not something I thought too much when I was younger George but a way of life I am trying to embrace now!!
    Please don’t forget the little people when you hit the big time!!

    Liked by 1 person

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  8. Almost Iowa

    When you become famous – please forget about me. I am a Minnesotan and we don’t like to draw attention. I don’t know how I could handle it if people whisper were to whisper, “Hey, that’s the guy who knows the guy who…”

    That would be devastating.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. George Post author

      Lol… Sorry but I can’t forget a Minnesotan as funny as you who not only hit the like button but commented, as well. You’re in for big things when I become famous😊

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  9. Kate Crimmins

    I totally get this. I hit a milestone birthday in January and have been almost consumed with it. Not in a morbid way, but recognizing it, accepting it and trying to move on. I wondered when I adopted my last cat whether she would outlive me and what arrangements I should make for her. Each decision I make is with the thought, “is this right for me now?” At this point I don’t want a bigger house, more work or a full time job. I am happy with “me time” and an occasional gig or two. I have a friend who keeps trying to get me involved in large scale work projects. I’m not interesting the spending the time on it when I have other things I want to do (like writing about nonsense!).

    Liked by 1 person

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    1. George Post author

      Lol…you never wrote about nonsense, Kate. But you’re right, these thoughts that involve things in the future seem to come with a disclaimer or attached mind comment these days. Like you, I know people who want to keep working in some capacity and while I think it’s great if that’s what you love, it’s not for me. Sometimes I think people don’t want to retire because they don’t know what they’ll do with their time. I never have that problem. There is always something to keep me busy but it’s usually my choice and that’s a good feeling.
      Time has now become more of a focus in very different ways. It’s interesting how the mind reacts and digests the reality of the future.

      Liked by 1 person

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  10. Ann Coleman

    Write this down: Ann M. Coleman liked each and every one of your posts!!! Both figuratively and literally. I want credit for having good taste…
    Seriously, I can relate to so much of this. I don’t have grandchildren (yet), but I am very aware that I am entering a new phase of life, and probably the last phase in which I truly have choices and good health. And so I want to make the most of it, and wish I had the good sense to have this attitude when I was both young and stupid. But that’s also okay. It’s not morbid to recognize our own mortality; it’s just realistic. And gives us the incentive to make every day count.
    Thanks for another great post, George!

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    1. George Post author

      Don’t worry, Annie, Because of all your likes and comments these past few years, you have a special place reserved in my new Kingdom, wherever that might be…:) I don’t forget loyalty..:)
      I think we all wish our youth gave us more insights and appreciation for life in its various stages but enlightenment only comes with age, it seems. But we take what we clan, when we can and make the best of what’s in front of us. Really, there is no other choice..:)

      Liked by 1 person

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  11. Pistachios

    “the youth years of the rest of my life” – yep, totally get it, and I reckon it’s a wonderful sentiment to have.
    I’m quite a bit younger than you, and there are times that I feel very aware of my mortality too. Far from being morbid, I reckon it’s a good thing (in the right doses). Sometimes it’s what I need to refocus, or to get myself into gear and keep going.
    Thanks for sharing your thoughts πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

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  12. reocochran

    I think it is true, we feel our age a bit more now. I just wrote on a person who was turning 50’s blog. I said going from 49 to 50 didn’t bother me so much as 59-60. Yikes!
    I think you are enjoying life and may find a great second chapter of your life. Good luck, George and enjoy the ride! πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

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  13. Kim Gorman

    Hi George, thoughtful post. I’m not quite 65 yet, but I hope to be someday, and at 48 I am thinking a lot already about my time left on earth and how we never know when it might end. My mother-in-law recently passed away, and my husband was hospitalized after an on-the-job injury, so death has been on my mind. Some random thoughts about this: All we really have for sure is now, this moment, this day, and making the most of it by being loving and kind and trying to have fun with whatever curveball life throws at you is how we can do this. Then there are our choices. I realize I’m getting too old to let life and circumstances or fate or what have you drag me along. I need to be intentional and make choices for my life that support me being able to live my values. Not easy at all, but no one else will do it for me. Thanks for this post!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. George Post author

      You’re so right, Kim, no one else will do it for you. It’s your choice how and where to live your life. I’m so sorry about your mother in law and I hope your husband is much better.
      I also hope you enjoyed your trips…:)

      Liked by 1 person

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