A Man Called Ove

“People said Ove saw the world in black and white. But she was color. All the color he had.”
Fredrik Backman, A Man Called Ove

I’m not a book reviewer and I rarely suggest one because everyone has different tastes when it comes to what they enjoy reading. But I’ll make an exception for A Man Called Ove.

This is a word of mouth book written by Swedish author, Fredrik Backman that has become an international best seller. It is a story of loss and love, how first impressions are not always reliable and why people should first be understood before we pass judgment.   It will make you laugh out loud and bring tears to your eyes in a matter of pages.

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A brief synopsis from the back cover…

At first sight, Ove is almost certainly the grumpiest man you will ever meet, a curmudgeon with staunch principles, strict routines and a short fuse. People think him bitter and he thinks himself surrounded by idiots.
Ove’s well-ordered solitary world gets a shakeup one November morning with the appearance of new neighbors, a chatty young couple and their two boisterous daughters, who announce their arrival by accidentally flattening Ove’s mailbox with their U-haul. What follows is a heartwarming tale of unkept cats, unlikely friendships and a community’s unexpected reassessment of the one person they thought they had all figured out.

If you’re looking for a gift this holiday season or just want an easy read to curl up with during the holidays, I have a feeling Ove will reward the time you spend with him.

One last passage from the book…

“To love someone is like moving into a house,” Sonja used to say. “At first you fall in love with everything new, you wonder every morning that this is one’s own, as if they are afraid that someone will suddenly come tumbling through the door and say that there has been a serious mistake and that it simply was not meant that you would live so fine. But as the years go by, the facade worn, the wood cracks here and there, you start to love this house not so much for all the ways it is perfect but for all the ways it is not. You become familiar with all its nooks and crannies. How to avoid that the key gets stuck in the lock if it is cold outside. Which floorboards have some give when you step on them, and exactly how to open the doors for them not to creak. That’s it, all the little secrets that make it your home. “
– Fredrik Backman , A Man Called Ove”

Enjoy!

50 thoughts on “A Man Called Ove

    1. George Post author

      Hey uju…how are you? That’s unfortunate about Amazon. Do you have a local bookstore that might have it in stock? It’s not a new book. I hope you find it. I’m sure you’ll enjoy it.
      Great to hear from you. Stay well…:)

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      1. uju

        Oh my! I did find an eBook and I read it and this is the best thing I’ve read in a liking time.
        Thank you for recommending it 🙂

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  1. Osyth

    I haven’t ‘known’ you for long but I’m confident that your recommendation will be worthwhile for me. In honesty as a hungry and voracious reader I will pretty much read anything that’s put in front of me and I am always delighted with new ideas. Thank you

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    1. George Post author

      Thank you, Osyth. I hope you enjoy it if you read it. I’ve only suggested one other book on here and although The Great Gatsby is my favorite book, The Shadow Of The Wind became a very close second after I read it a few years ago. The author is Carlos Ruiz Zafron and the story reads more like beautiful poetry than prose. A line from the story..”few things leave a deeper mark on the reader than the first book that finds its way to his heart.”
      If you love to read, you will love this book.
      Enjoy!

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      1. Osyth

        What an exquisite little gem of a line – how dan I resist when the writer so clearly understands the condition of the reader. The Great Gatsby would argue for my top spot if, at gun-point I was forced to compile an achingly short list of my favourite books. This is an exercise I force myself to go through often with books, films, music and artwork, even buildings …. I keep notebooks, have done since my teens which are pebble-dashed with lists tucked amongst all sorts of ramblings and discursive wanderings and it is interesting to see what changes and what remains the same.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Kim Gorman

    I have complete trust and faith in your recommendation, George. It must be a truly wonderful book for you to suggest it. I love the book cover synopsis, and the passage is fantastic. What a wonderful metaphor to liken love to a house – it’s so true! Thanks for sharing this. I’m going to ask my local library if they have it or plan to order it.

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  3. sportsattitudes

    Sounds like a great read and also well-timed for the Holidays as a gift for someone…or a gift to give one’s soul. I love that last passage you included. Made me think of our home. In our eleventh year here and indeed, some of the nuisance things we encountered upon arrival now are looked at almost fondly. What annoys early on…you almost become possessive about once mastered. Totally identify with that. Thanks for the tip on this one George.

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  4. Ann Coleman

    Thanks for the recommendation! My book club read this book a while back, but I was out of town for that meeting, and so didn’t bother reading the book either. Clearly, that was a mistake. I’m going to put it on my Christmas list!

    Liked by 1 person

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      1. Ann Coleman

        Now I figured out I was wrong, as usual. They talked about reading this book for the last meeting I missed, but it wasn’t available in a book club set yet. So we’re going to read it in February. And now I get to read it, and still have it count for book club! Sometimes it’s good to be wrong.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. George Post author

      Merry Christmas to you and your family also, Tonya..:)
      By the way, I finished The Bedford Boys recently. It was a tough book to read but very well done. People just don’t understand the lasting affects of war and loss on families. It must have been a very difficult time for that community. In many ways I imagine it still is.
      I almost wish I had read it before visiting. I guess I’ll just have to visit again one day…:)
      Enjoy your holiday..:)

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      1. Fourth Generation Farmgirl

        Thank you so much, George. 🙂 I understand your sentiments regarding the book. You’re right. The loss of those young men definitely left a lasting wound on the community. The D-Day Memorial is such a poignant reminder of their sacrifice.

        I think another visit would be nice. Maybe next time, Scott and I could meet you all for lunch. 🙂

        P.S. Speaking of war, and since it’s Christmas, I’m reminded of a film called Joyeux Noel. It’s about the soldiers on the frontline during Christmas 1914. It’s one of the most beautiful and moving films I’ve ever watched. It’s my favorite “Christmas movie .” I think you’d enjoy it. 🙂

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      2. George Post author

        Thank you for the film suggestion. It sounds familiar but I’ll have to watch if for sure now. I remember the story being told but not sure if I ever saw the film.
        Have a great Christmas, Tonya…:)

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Shelley

    A friend recommended this book, so I requested it from Overdrive (our library’s on line app). There are 40 people ahead of me. Your review convinced me I should order it from Amazon to keep me engrossed during an upcoming plane ride. Thanks for sharing. (And thanks for stopping by my blog).

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  6. CineMuseFilms

    Glad you enjoyed this book as I loved the film. My review concludes:
    The sheer force of the film lies in a lonely man’s memories expressed through Ove’s wide-eyed face. Some viewers may feel emotionally manipulated but that would be a harsh judgement. This is an outstanding film about universal emotions that all of us at some time will witness or experience.

    Liked by 1 person

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    1. George Post author

      Very well said. I haven’t seen the film yet but I always read the book first, especially when it comes to the exploration of minds and emotions. Films rarely do those types of books justice. I’m glad you enjoyed the film. Now I have to see it..:)

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