Timeless Music

I love music. I can’t play a lick of anything or carry a tune but it doesn’t stop me from singing out loud or making believe I’m the worlds greatest guitarist or drummer, depending on the song.

There isn’t a music format I won’t listen to because I think everything means something to someone and like all creative art forms, you never know when you might find something of yourself in those words or lyrics. Of course like many people I gravitate toward certain genres; primarily the stuff I grew up with during the fifties, sixties and seventies. That’s not a bad time period to make an argument about it being the best. If I had to narrow it down even more, I’d say the stuff that came out of the sixties was the very best. Of course I’m probably bias, but maybe there is some validity to my feelings.

Think about the artists that came through during that time and the music they created. The Beatles, Dylan, Joplin, The Dead, Hendrix, Simon and Garfunkel, The Stones, The Doors, The Beach Boys, The Who, Pink Floyd, Creedence, The Kinks, Led Zep, James Brown, All of Motown, Aretha, Elvis, Ray Charles, The Four Seasons, The Animals, Zappa, The Everly Brothers, The British Invasion groups, Chuck Berry.

And I’m just getting started.

Their music is timeless.

I was watching something on television the other night, one of the few things I didn’t DVR, and two commercials came on back to back. One had music from The Stones and one from The Doors. As I was watching, I’m thinking to myself, this music is fifty years old and it’s still being played to in a way to attract the attention of consumers.

Then I thought about some of the songs that I remember hearing for other commercials and looked some up; Led Zep for Cadillac, Bobby Darin for Carnival Cruises, The Stones for Chase, The Yardbirds, Herman’s Hermits, Climax and The Kinks for Chevy, The Ronettes for Cialis, The Who for Cisco, Three Dog Night for Citgo, The Turtles for Clinique, Fats Domino for Dr Pepper, The Zombies for Fidelity, Chad and Jeremy for ESPN.

The list goes on.

I’m not a musician but believe it was the richest period of time in contemporary music. Of course I’m not including classical music in this statement.

These are songs that young people still sing today. Fifty years later and it appears the music from that decade doesn’t have a shelf life. Maybe music in general doesn’t. Maybe we hear a song or some chords from another time and regardless of where we are or how long ago it was written, time pretty much stands still.

Still, as much as I enjoy some of the music being written and performed today, I often wonder if they’ll be playing it in the year 2066 in ways it’s being played today.

Then again, those of you around during that time will probably have a music chip implanted in your head somewhere that controls your play list, advertising preferences, movie choices and book reads, all viewed or listened to during times of deep meditation with a touch of incense.

Oh wait, that sounds a little like the sixties, doesn’t it.

64 thoughts on “Timeless Music

  1. davidprosser

    The sixties music resonated with me but I hit a blip in the seventies and then really started enjoying the eighties again and the modern romantics. Apart from the odd artist the blip started again in the nineties and has been here ever since.Motown was my biggest love and had such an influence on others but virtually anything from the sixties is recognisable by today’s kids as great music even if they don’t know how old it is. I’ve been asked how come I know something modern if I’m whistling an oldie that’s currently used for an advert.
    The hopes of the sixties may have dies as some youth joined the establishment but the music lives on.
    Hugs

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  2. sportsattitudes

    I grew up in the era of Disco and Motown…but also of Boston, Led Zeppelin, The Stones and Fleetwood Mac…and would like to think I’m still wide-open to enjoying any type of song or musical style. When someone asks me what type of music I listen to all I can really do is offer up what’s on my current playlist because I can’t help them one bit in defining what I like. I just know what I like once I hear it.

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    1. George Post author

      The 80’s was a strange time for music, wasn’t it. Almost nondescript except for some hair bands. The music. If the sixties, even after all this time transcends generations and stands on its own.

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  3. Kate Crimmins

    Those were great years. I would extend it into the 70s too. There is nothing like a song to make you feel young again. Only time will tell if any of today’s musicians that stability.

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  4. Jodi

    Love it George! Music is such a special “language” – just watching the movie Straight out of Compton about a completely different genre of music. All so interesting. I will never forget the day when my oldest son, Jake, who was a music major in college – who now works for a music company and does DJing on the side – told me “music speaks to me in a way no words or any other sense can accomplish. And I want to share that with others.”

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    1. George Post author

      Your son is very lucky to have music affect his senses in that way. It’s amazing how a song can place you in a very specific place in your life. Not just a year or period but a moment in your life.
      I’ve always been fascinated with people who are art forms differently than the rest of us and speak a language unique to their love. Just like your son. That’s very cool.

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  5. Miriam

    Hey George, I love my music too. I love my disco tunes I have to admit but my music tastes range from the great bands of the seventies and eighties, the classics to what’s on now. I’m pretty open minded but I’ll always love The Eagles, Fleetwood Mac, Phil Collins … the list goes on and on. Not a day goes by that I don’t have music playing in my house. Nothing makes me feel better when I’m down than playing some music. Or having a tinker on my guitar.

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    1. George Post author

      Hi Miriam…I like some disco also and your other choices are all top shelf. You’re right, there is music that fits every mood. I envy those who express themselves with an instrument. Good for you…:)

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  6. Ilona Elliott

    I think I read somewhere that music stimulates more areas of the brain than any other activity. It is such a huge quality of life factor for me. CNN just aired the two part History of the Eagles tonight. It’s was worth the time to sit and watch it. I find the 60’s and early 70’s were the bomb for creativity and personal expression through music. Still my favorite music, but there are some creative bands around now too–fusing different sounds and unusual combinations of instruments. Great post to stimulate discussion George. Thanks!

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    1. George Post author

      That comment about music and brain stimulation wouldn’t surprise me at all. I saw that special on The Eagles on a cable channel recently and it was really interesting to listen and see how it all developed. That was a great period of time musically.
      Thanks for visiting and sharing your thoughts.

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  7. DailyMusings

    Such great music through all those years- and as you said much of it has withstood the years and is still played. I find I often get bored with some of the new music I’ll download and listen to-I seem never to tire of the old songs though. Don’t know if it is because they transport me back in time and make me nostalgic, but I think it’s really just because it ‘s great music. Love this post George. πŸ™‚

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    1. George Post author

      You’re right about much of the current music. I don’t want to sound like an old crotchety guy but today’s music all sounds the same to me. With few exceptions, like Adele, I can’t differentiate between bands or artists. That makes me crazy. And I still watch the Grammy’s but it’s getting harder each year.
      The music from the sixties has held up very well, as have the artists. They didn’t disappear after 2-3 years.

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  8. John Coltrane aka Frankie 5 Angels

    Music is timeless, the way it can bring you back to a time and place, a memory that only connects with the song as you hear it play and turn up the volume so you can sing along. For me it’s always been the best antidepressant without a prescription, from the big band swing of the 40’s the do wop and group vocals of the 50’s the Motown & British Invasion of the 60’s the 70’s Rock and 80’s dance Disco phase and let’s not forget American Popular Standards and Sinara one of my favorites…right to present day where I can still enjoy with the help of my daughters who keep me in tune so to speak. Thanks for the post George!

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    1. George Post author

      Frankie 5…sorry to hear about Tessio this past week….:)
      You’re right about music and how it transports you. And of course I can’t forget about Mr. Sinatra, our Jersey Pisano. Summer Wind is still one of my favorites.
      Having daughters who keep you in time…that’s funny..:)

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  9. Ann Coleman

    You are so right about how much truly timeless music came from the sixties! I have Sirius radio in my car, and often listen to the Sixties station. My kids never complained about listening to it, either, and even sang along when they were young. There’s also an eighties station, but it doesn’t have the same appeal at all.
    As for those chips we’re all going to have implanted in our brains some day, I think I already have one. And it’s not working half the time….

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  10. Nurse Kelly

    Wonderful post, Blogfather! (Couldn’t resist)

    As the saying goes, “What goes around comes around,” right? I like the music chip idea (kind of)with meditation, but incense gives me a headache! Can’t be healthy to breathe that stuff!

    Your post reminds me of a place we went to for pizza the other night called, “The Mellow Mushroom.” It had a real hippy vibe – quite psychedelic and all, with a mural over the kitchen of a person in lotus position. I love when the music of the past recycles back through, but wish the drugs would stay in the past… guess I’m dreaming.

    Happy Sunday, George!

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    1. George Post author

      Lol…I don’t mind at all. It always makes me laugh.
      I agree about the incense. If I walk into a store that has it burning, I immediately turn around and walk out. It makes me choke.
      The Mellow Mushroom sounds like a pretty cool place though I hope you didn’t have to explain the name if you went with your children..:) That would have been a interesting conversation.
      Happy Sunday, Kelly😊

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    2. Holly'sMom

      Mellow Mushroom is definitely different. πŸ™‚ Had them in Georgia about thirty years ago. The first time I went to one you definitely believed where you were eating just “might not” be only for pizza. πŸ˜‰ Not sure when they began spreading elsewhere. Their pizza wasn’t great, at first, but fortunately it has improved.

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      1. Nurse Kelly

        You’ve been there too! Yes, on the side of the to go box it says it opened in 1974. I’m in the Cleveland area, and the one we went to has been open for about a year now. We had a shiitake mushroom pizza and I can honestly say it was one of the best pizzas I’ve ever had. Must be the molasses in the crust! πŸ™‚

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      2. Holly'sMom

        Yes! First time I went to one was in Atlanta back in the eighties. I think it was the one where the business first got started, as it apparently got started in Atlanta by a Ga. Tech. and I think a University of Ga. alumni. I live in South Carolina now, and we have them here. Not sure how long they’ve been in our little S.C. town.

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  11. Carol Ferenc

    Great post, George. I would add Springsteen, Eagles, Fleetwood Mac to the list. I loved that music. Today’s music all sounds the same to me, unfortunately. But then, my parents said the very same thing about rock ‘n roll back in the 60s.

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  12. Shelley

    if you ride the subway in NYC you are occasionally treated to an impromptu concert by someone trying to earn a few bucks. Usually it is a Motown tune. Yesterday when I joined in, the three young women in their 20’s sang along with me. “My Girl”, “Lean on Me”. these are timeless tunes that had everyone smiling.

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    1. George Post author

      Motown is ridiculously good and like the two songs you sang, timeless. It seems everyone knows the words to those songs. Those street concerts in the city are sometimes pretty impressive.

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  13. In My Cluttered Attic

    I love jazz and a lot of the jazz from the 60’s was great. But in general, most of the music from the 60’s was pretty fabulous. The fact that it still resonates with people today suggest that I’m right, and as some young whipper snapper might sayβ€”old too. But, at least I have good taste. :o)

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  14. Holly'sMom

    Sixties, Seventies, and I’m tossing in the eighties. Lots of good music from those three decades. I find music today to be fairly good, but nothing like those from the 60’s, 70’s, and 80’s. Then again, I guess we are all biased to what we grew up with, huh? There is a fairly new song floating around today that I love. Could just be me, but I feel like it has a sound and feel of music from a previous era. I am not posting the actual video because I’m not nuts about it, but here is the song and lyrics. (P.S. sung by Ellie King, daughter to Rob Schneider of SNL)

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    1. George Post author

      X’s and O’s…I’ve heard that song and you’re right it could be from another time, though she seems like she’s been around the block a few times…:) good suggestion..;)

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  15. Flop til you drop "FTYD"

    I agree with you… both my hubby and I are in our 40’s and we just said the other day, music is different now. There are things in the past that stand the test of time. Whether it’s “bubble-gum” rock from the 50s. Chubby Checker. Motown (Supremes, Marvin Gaye) 60’s and bands like Beatles, Elvis, Rolling Stones, all the “classic” rock of Led Zepplin, Aerosmith, even guys like Bob Seager. Our parents introduced us to Jefferson Airplane, The Doors… Even when we were kids and in high school (listening to punk, and new wave) a lot of that stuff the guys had already been out for years – like The Clash. All that stuff, like Blondie, can still be played and we like it all. My kids like Billy Idol. In all genres, the stuff was great. Including funk George Clinton (Atomic Dog) and old Rapp (Run D MC) The Gap Band. Even Heavy Metal bands like Metallica.

    But this new stuff my kids are listening to, all electronica crap, and rap that degrades women…and the fading of Album (choosing a cover was huge back in the day and making a music video) and the introduction of everything being on line iTunes and just buying a song… I really don’t think many of these songs are going to stand through time.

    And I like everything. So, it makes me sad. We are making it our mission that our kids are familiar with well-known songs that are famous. Stair Way to Heaven, Smoke on the Water, Walk this way, Pretty Woman… could go on and on

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    1. George Post author

      You’re good parents exposing your children to classic music of the best kind..:) you’re right, I don’t think much of it will last past this decade let alone fifty years from now. Adele of course, but she’s an exception..:) like you, I enjoy everything but I get turned off by anger and abuse. That’s hard for me to get my arms around.

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  16. aginggracefullymyass

    My 32 year old son is into the music of today – especially the techno stuff (I did a post in August about having to listen to DeadMau5 for 2 hours – I was trapped in a car with him! OMG it was torture!) But he also loves the music of the 60’s and 70’s which redeems him! Really, it was the best music ever made – something about it is very, very special. There are exceptions though – like The Archies and Tony Orlando & Dawn. πŸ™‚

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    1. George Post author

      Lol…yes, the Archies and the bubble gum sound were hard to digest. I can’t imagine being tormented with two hours of techno. Did he not have any regard for your sanity?..:)

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  17. The Coastal Crone

    Like classical music the good stuff seems to stay. Even some of the movies are remakes. I liked your description of 2066. Who knows? I have already seen so many changes in my lifetime. Cheers for today though!

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  18. reocochran

    The best part about having brothers and friends all of that list of bands and musical artists were played in my formative junior high and high school years. I was blessed to have a high school babysitter who liked me like a baby sister. She saw the Beatles in real life in Cleveland and for days she would cry. When I went to see John Denver and Neil Diamond, I cried at a couple of songs but I never went to as BIG and famous a band as the Beatles or the Stones. I saw Harry Chapin, Simon and Garfunkel, James Taylor, Chicago, Todd Rundgren, etc. . . I am grateful for these memories. My brothers are the ones who traveled and saw Bruce S, Pink Floyd, The Who, Led Zeppelin . . .

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